Tripel Threat Fried Pickles

Tripel Threat Fried Pickles

Editor’s Note: This recipe ran on July 31, 2014 on DrinkingCraft.com.

This dish has been designed to be an uncommon flavor experience. Belgian beer, dill pickles and peanut satay sauce aren’t exactly commonly found together. But the combination of the three are out of this world.

But… I have a little secret.

I was really hoping to find a dish that made the combination of peanut butter and pickles more accessible. My childhood was spent eating Peanut Butter & Pickle Sandwiches. I wanted to share that love with all of you, but I know it’s not as easy to reconcile as something with a little more thought behind it.

My hopes are, you all become a fan of this dish, that has some more finesse and complexity to it… then serve up your kids a PB&P sandwich for lunch next weekend. Fingers crossed?

Beer-soaked dills, battered and fried, then served with a spicy satay sauce.

Beer-soaked dills, battered and fried, then served with a spicy satay sauce.

Tripel Threat Fried Pickles
pickles

1 12-oz jar dill pickle chips
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp seasoned salt
1 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 bottle Belgian Tripel (2 tbsp reserved for sauce)
canola oil (for frying)

satay sauce
1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
2 tbsp soy sauce
3 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp lime juice
1 tbsp Sriracha (more, if preferred)
2 tbsp Belgian Tripel

Begin by draining your pickles and leaving them set out in the strainer for a half hour. Shake any excess liquid off and place them in a shallow bowl. Cover with the beer and let set for an hour.

In the meantime, put all of your sauce ingredients in a food processor or blender and combining until smooth and fully mixed. Refrigerate until ready to use.

In a large glass bowl, blend flour, salt, paprika and cayenne pepper. Preheat  4-6 inches of canola oil on the stove over medium heat.

In batches, remove pickle slices (enough that you will only have a single layer in your pan) with a strainer and shake off excess beer. Dredge thoroughly in flour mixture.

Drop coated pickles into the hot oil (away from you), one at a time. They will sink at first and then float. After 5 minutes or so, flip them to make sure both sides get cooked thoroughly. Cook about 10 minutes (per batch) or until golden brown. Remove to a paper towel-lined plate. Repeat until all pickles have been prepared.

Serve with satay sauce.



About

Fontina has an Ohio heart and Philly spunk. She loves giving you recipes for hearty food, pop-culture puns and a hell of a lot of craft beer. You can find her in the kitchen, at the bar, on Twitter or marathoning episodes of Shin Chan or Bob's Burgers online.


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